Monday, June 21, 2004

 

Is There a Solution?

There is only one possible solution: true, representative democracy!

But, there are a number of problems that prevent “conventional” nation-wide democratic elections from being implemented in Iraq under the present conditions.

1. There are no national, credible political figures or parties. This is no coincidence! It has been the active policy of the past regime for more than three decades to achieve just that!

2. Although there was a national census in 1997, this is rejected by many of the present political forces. Furthermore, it did not include the Kurdish north as that area was not under the control of the central government at that time.

3. There is such a wide spectrum of ethnic, religious and sectarian diversity stressed and distorted by decades of violent oppression that a national consensus seems almost impossible if engineered from the top.

4. There is an extremely wide diversity of "life-styles" ranging from people truly living in the 21st century to people literally living in the dark ages.

5. Another problem is that democracy within Iraq may well result in tyranny of some segments of our community over minorities.


The only possible way to achieve some form of democracy quickly and non-violently is through local representation using the smallest possible wards. The proposed solution to the dilemma of democracy and leadership is to establish a wide-base, local government-oriented democracy as quickly as possible (in a time-scale of weeks) from the bottom up.

There are many wise and decent people in this country who are locally known within their communities. Let the people bring them forward!

We need a system that reflects the will of the people… all the people.


Comments:
I agree. The will of the people, all of the people is the only legitimate basis for any government. The trick is how to express that will when the total community is made up of many diverse perspectives and goals.

I believe the answer is through a collective political system of small communities who benefit equally from the national government and from natural resources.

Local communities must be able to maintain their own identity and perspective without fear of interference or dilution by being part of a greater collective. National goals should be dedicated to preserving this diversity and mediating conflicts through law when internal societies collide.

Local government is often viewed as the weakest link in a state's political system. It should be the reverse. Representative democracy fails when power leaves the people, or its local representatives and becomes concentrated elsewhere.
 
For the life of me, I don't understand why the CPA didn't encourage the kind of system you describe. It seems obvious to me, though as an American resident in Europe I have absolutely no local knowledge at all. I'm glad to have this idea confirmed by a local.
Would local councils from hard-core areas of Ba'athist support have accepted this system? Would they have used it to try and destroy any new democratic system from coming into being? Perhaps these are the questions that caused the CPA to dismiss such an option. (I am assuming they must at least have considered it.)
 
IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOLLOWS:

Remember "Gulf War syndrome" from teh first Persian Gulf War? I found out what it is: depleted uranium poisoning. See, the Dept. of Defense still claims it's harmless, and uses it now more than ever, in Abrams tank armor, in tank gun rounds, in 30mm ammunition fired from A-10 'Warthogs', and a myriad of other uses I'm not privy to. Is it used in the 25mm Bushmaster chain gun in Bradleys and Marine LAV-25s? I don't know; if I had to guess I'd say probably. The worst part is when it becomes depleted uranium dust; a single particle of it in your respiratory system is cancer-causing. Think about that for a moment. So far in this war the Department of Defense has used over four times the amount of depleted uranium that it used in Gulf War One. Imagine how much worse the "Gulf War syndrome" will be this time!! So far over 200,000 vets from Gulf War One have filed for disability because of being crippled by it and are in varying stages of dying miserably. Several thousand have died from it already. It also afflicts their spouses and even causes their babies to be born with grotesque birth defects!!
So how about that? The Department of Defense "supports the troops" by first poisoning you all, then denying it knows the cause of the "mystery illness"!! The callous disregard for the lives of its own troops is breathtakingly despicable. Every soldier, marine, airman and sailor should be thoroughly outraged. Please pass this information on to everyone you can.
 
That's a very good question that need to explain.
 
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